10 mile swim

It isn't far to swim when you have friends waiting at the end.


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How to Swim 500 Miles a Year

For the past three years (2104, 2015, and 2016), I have swum over 500 miles a year. It’s hard to articulate why. It’s not as if when I was a child I dreamed of being the kind of crazy person who swims 500 miles a year. But that’s the kind of crazy person I turned out to be. And if you think you might be that kind of crazy person too, here’s my advice on how to do it.

Let me note that I have two advantages. First, I work at a university with a pool. That means that most of the time I just have to get out of my office and walk across campus to swim (walking across campus is easy; getting out of the office is hard). Second, I have a lot of control over my schedule. I don’t have infinite flexibility, but I have more power to decide when I do things than some people do.

On the other hand, my life is not simple. I have a full-time job, two kids, a dog, and regular volunteer commitments. I have things going on. I’m sure you do too. So how do you get to 500 miles a year?

1) Put swimming on the schedule, and make it mandatory.

There are some things that I have do at certain times. For example, I have to teach my classes at their scheduled times. Teaching class at its scheduled time is mandatory. I do not schedule meetings, student conferences, medical appointments, haircuts, or anything else during the time I teach.

In the same way, during the school year I swim at the pool at lunchtime. Swimming at that time is mandatory. I do not schedule meetings, student conferences, medical appointments, haircuts, or anything else during the time I swim.

Last summer, I was coaching swim team on weekday mornings starting at 8 am. I got to the pool every morning at 6:15 to swim a couple miles before the children arrived. That was the only time I could swim, so that was when I did it. Every day.

Put swimming on the schedule, and make it mandatory.

2) Make alternative plans.

Sometimes (heaven help me) I have to go to a lunch meeting. Or I have a university event or a conference out of town or maybe even a vacation. That does not mean I don’t swim. I figure out another way.

In 2015, our pool shut down unexpectedly and without warning. The Powers That Be arranged for us to swim for free at a nearby pool, which was terrific. Unfortunately, that pool’s open swim hours were not the same as our open swim hours. I rescheduled everything I could. I made it to lap swim at that pool, every day, until our pool reopened.

When I went to Vancouver for a combination work trip/vacation, I swam at the Kitsilano Beach pool. When the family went to Disney in Orlando for my in-laws’ 50th anniversary, we swam at Lucky’s Lake Swim (it helps to marry into a family of swimmers). I’ve swum at public pools and health center pools and various Ys, not to mention some lakes and the occasional ocean, in the U.S., Canada, England, and Ireland.

I have written about travel swimming before; my quick advice is to pack a suit, a cap, goggles, flip-flops, a lock, and a towel. Bring your second-best towel, just in case.

The point is, you will inevitably run into problems. Don’t give up. Find another time to swim; find another place to swim. Make alternative plans.

3) Trust the swimming.

There are days when I don’t want to swim. There are days when I don’t have time to swim. You know what I do on those days? I go swimming anyway.

I have found that the days that I don’t want to swim and I don’t have time to swim are the days when swimming helps me the most. I think better when I swim. I work better when I swim. I am a better person when I swim.

Don’t debate with yourself about whether you should go swimming. Just go. Get up wherever you are, and head toward the water. Trust the swimming.


There are obstacles that can keep a person from swimming. I have experienced some of them. I had a period of time when I could not swim, in the sense that my doctor told me, “You cannot swim.” When my children were small, it was very difficult to find time to get to the pool. I know that costs and transportation problems are significant impediments for many people, and there are probably other issues I haven’t thought of.

But if you don’t have those barriers in your life, and you think it would be fun to swim 500 miles a year, don’t mistake solvable problems for major obstacles. A regular — if somewhat crazy — person can do it.


Here are some numbers: 500 miles is 880,000 yards. I usually swim 3600 yards a day, five days a week. If I’m heading toward a big swim, I swim more. But at a 3600 yard a day, five day a week pace, a person can swim 500 miles in 49 weeks, leaving three weeks for illness or unavoidable obligations.

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My monthly totals from 2016. Screenshot from my USMS flog (fitness log), December 2016.


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In Hot Water (Splashville Open Water Challenge 2016 Race Report)

Hot. Damn hot. Hot and wet.

For much of the first ever Splashville Open Water Challenge, I had the weather report from Good Morning, Vietnam running through my mind (Robin Williams, link here, rated R). It was hot, damn hot, hot and wet. Every body of water I’ve been in all summer long has been hot, and Percy Priest Lake in Nashville was no exception.

Some places, it’s been too hot to swim. The Lake Lure open water swim, which was supposed to be the 1 mile and 5K USMS championships, was called off due to high water temperatures — up to 89-90° F. (I blogged about the 2015 Lake Lure race here.) Last week I was talking with another swimmer about the cancellation of the Lake Lure swim when a third person interrupted excitedly, “Was it because of bacteria? Brain-eating amoebas?” “No,” I said, “it was because of the heat.” I suppose brain-eating amoebas get all the press, but heat, as boring as it seems, is much more likely to hurt you. Since the death of Fran Crippen in 2010, swimming organizations have put upper limits on water temperature for open water races; USMS rules state, “A swim shall not begin if the water temperature exceeds 85° F.”

After the Lake Lure swim was cancelled, swimmers started worrying about the water temperature for Splashville. The race director posted updates in the Facebook group. A week before the race, she put up a photo of a thermometer reading 82° F, and there was much rejoicing. But on the morning of the race, as we stood on the shore after warmups, it was announced that the water temperature was 88° F, and a sheet of paper was passed around for the swimmers to sign, indicating that we understood USMS did not sanction the event and we were swimming at our own risk.

I suppose that if I were less experienced at open water swimming, I might have freaked out. But I’ve done this before. And I had swum over four miles in Lake Hartwell about a month ago in 87° F water; it wasn’t ideal, but I knew what to expect. A coach came up to some of her swimmers, standing in line behind me, and told them to swim at 10% of maximum. We all agreed we were going to take it easy.

So I took it easy. I enjoyed the scenery. It was too damn hot to do anything else.

Percy Priest Lake at Hamilton Creek Park. Before the race. My photo August 2016.

It’s a good-looking lake. Percy Priest Lake at Hamilton Creek Park. Before the race. My photo. August 2016.

Since the swim, the Splashville race director has contacted the participants to say that she’s hoping to move the event to April next year. I think that’s a terrific idea. I had a great time in Nashville. I stayed with nice people. We went to Hattie B’s for hot chicken. But while I like hot chicken, I don’t much like hot water. I’d be delighted to come back — in April.

On the positive side, I am not at all worried that the water will be cold for Swim the Suck in October. It’s been a long, hot summer. Bring on the fall!


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On Hunger

I’m hungry. Not in a metaphorical, Beowulfian, lofgeornost sense — I’m not eager for fame. I am eager for food. I’m hungry. It’s the swimming that does it.

Hunger is an established side effect of swimming. Discussions of the phenomenon tend to focus on how to deal with the hunger (a typical example: Why Am I Always Hungry after Swimming?). But I know how to deal with hunger. I eat.

In a food-obsessed culture, we talk surprisingly little about hunger. I read foodie blogs that lovingly describe the complex tastes of carefully sourced, intricately prepared foods. But taste is not located in the food; it has no reality external to the taster. And hunger transforms food, makes it taste so much better. The difference between eating a plate of mac and cheese because you have fifteen minutes before you have to get somewhere and this is the only time you have for dinner and eating a plate of mac and cheese after swimming two miles hard in a cold lake? It’s huge. The mac and cheese might be the same, but you are different.

It doesn’t matter if the mac and cheese is made with Velveeta or with artisanal cheese made from the milk of lovingly massaged cows; it will taste better when you’re hungry.

Women in particular are not supposed to admit to hunger. If we talk about it, we’re talking about how to ignore it, how to thwart it. Consider the advice to drink a glass of water when you’re hungry. You might really be thirsty, the articles say. Don’t eat; drink a glass of water. (Here’s an example of such an article.) I’m all in favor of drinking a glass of water, by the way, but I’m also in favor of eating something with your water when you’re hungry. Those articles are really saying, Don’t trust your own judgment about your body.

Or think of the articles that appear in women’s magazines every year about how to avoid eating at holiday parties: Eat, they say, before you go so that you won’t eat at the party. Eat alone, they say, in your house, when you’re not hungry, rather than eat in front of other people when you are hungry. God forbid you should eat in public when hungry. What chaos would ensue? You might actually enjoy the food. People might see you enjoying food. What a horrible thing, for you to enjoy food in public where people might see you.

Which gets me back to swimming: If you want to see women (predominately white, middle-aged women, given the demographics of the sport) enjoying food in public, go to the food tables at the end of an open water swim. I love to see them there. They take two sandwiches, and they go back for a third. They take the cookies. They eat and they drink and they laugh — and they don’t apologize for any of it.

I’m not saying that you need to earn your food through physical activity. You don’t have to earn the right to eat. I am saying that there is great joy in eating when you are hungry. And if you have lost what it feels like to be hungry (perhaps because you have been told not to trust your own judgment), you might go and swim, and feel hungry, and eat joyfully.


We are having a cold April here, and the water temperatures are dropping instead of rising. I don’t know when I’m going to get out to the lake to swim. At some point we will swim outside again. And we will eat food. In the meantime, I’m planning to swim my birthday (age x 100s) in the traditional manner next week.

Here’s how I’m doing on Go The Distance 2016:

USMS Go the Distance. April 9, 2016

USMS Go the Distance. April 9, 2016


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On Swim Equipment

In swimming, as in the rest of my life, I am torn between two competing desires. On one hand, I want to live my life free of the encumbrances of material possessions. On the other, I want cool toys.

Here is my advice about the swim equipment I use, in order of most to least necessary (or least to most frivolous):

1) Goggles

Goggles are one of the greatest inventions of the twentieth century. I met a man at the Lowcountry Splash one year who swam for Clemson University in the days before goggles. He said that his eyes hurt all the time. I believe him.

I usually wear Speedo Hydrospex Jr. goggles. They are marketed as youth goggles. But they fit me — unlike so-called adult goggles, which are really goggles for men and their great big heads. You can buy goggles marketed to women, but you pay less for youth sizes, and they work fine for me. Ignore the labels; get what works.

If you swim inside, you probably need clear or lightly colored lenses. If you swim outside, you probably need darker ones. They also sell goggles designed for open water swimming, ones that supposedly give you a better range of vision; I’ve tried a couple pairs, but they haven’t made a difference to me.

2) Fins

I love my fins. Without fins, kick drills are dull. But put on fins, and not only are you getting a better leg workout, you are moving much faster — and having more fun.

There are all kinds of fins for swimmers: long, short, special for breaststroke, etc. I have short ones, TYR Burners. Don’t use scuba fins; they won’t encourage the right kind of leg motion for swimming.

I should say that while I love my fins, my fins don’t always love me, by which I mean that I can wear them for months without trouble and then go through a period where they chafe my feet. I’m in one of those periods now; one of them is trying to chew through my right big toe. I don’t know why. Love is strange.

Fins and kickboard, wet from practice. My photo. Mar 2016.

Fins and kickboard, wet from practice. My photo. Mar 2016.

3) Ankle band

Many pools — though for some reason not mine — let you borrow pull buoys, which hold your legs up and keep you from kicking when you are doing pull drills. But as I’ve noted before, I don’t like pull buoys. Every once in a while I try one out, just to confirm that, yes, I still don’t like pull buoys. My back end floats just fine on its own; it does not require extra buoyancy.

But pull drills are easier when your legs are immobilized, and that’s why I have an ankle band. You put your feet in it, you twist it around, and bam! your legs are tied together. When I was a kid, we would use an inner tube for this purpose; if you weren’t careful when you put it on, the valve stem would poke you in the ankle. Now manufacturers make bands for this purpose. — no valve stems.

The ankle band I have comes from Finis and costs all of $5.

4) Kickboard

You don’t need to have your own kickboard. Pools generally have kickboards for you to borrow. Nonetheless, I like my kickboard better. Because it’s smaller and less buoyant than the standard type, it keeps my arms lower in the water, which puts less stress on my shoulders.

I worry about my shoulders. They are the parts that are going to wear out when parts start wearing out. They should get a rest during kick drills.

5) My fancy pants sports watch

I have a fancy sports watch — a Garmin fēnix 2. It’s got five different buttons on it. It’s got an altimeter, a barometer, and a compass. It will keep track of your cycling and your hiking and your downhill skiing. I will never use 90% of this stuff.

The reason I have a fēnix 2 (as opposed to anything else) that it is one of the few devices that will track both pool and open water distance. For pool swimming, you input the length of the pool, and the fēnix 2 keeps track of laps. For open water swimming, you activate the GPS to measure distance.

I got the fēnix 2 in November, and so far I have only used it in pools. I hope to be trying it out in an open water swim soon. Once you get the hang of pressing the right buttons to activate the lap counter and drill timer, though, it works great in the pool. List price is $400, but it can be had for half the cost.


If you are looking for information on a particular type of equipment, you can check out US Masters Swimming‘s reviews, both in the Swim Bag section of their magazine (accessible online) and in their video product reviews.

Please tell me about the equipment you like in the comments!


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500-Mile Go the Distance Cap

As promised, a photo with my 500-mile Go the Distance cap for 2015, now that it has finally come. If you swim 500 miles in a calendar year (and log it with US Masters Swimming), you can buy this nifty cap.

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Me with new cap. And we have new lights in the pool. It’s so much brighter. March 2016.

It fits well for a silicone cap. They are usually too big for me.

In other Go the Distance news, as of March 10, I have swum 104.55 miles in 2016:

2016-03-10

 


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Out With 2014, In With 2015: The Go the Distance Report

My goal for the 2014 USMS Go the Distance challenge was 500 miles. And as of December 31st I had swum . . .

624 miles!

Screenshot from my USMS flog (fitness log), Dec 31.

Screenshot from my USMS flog (fitness log), Dec 31.

It’s a smidge over 1000 km, which is one megameter (1 Mm). One megameter!

I’ve plotted 1000 km from my house at Free Map Tools, and it looks like this:

1000 K from here

1000 km from my house. Generated by Free Map Tools.

From here to Toronto is 1000 km. I’m just short of Miami in the other direction. I’ve been to Toronto, but I’ve never been to Miami. Coincidence?

I plan to set my goal at 500 miles for 2015 again. I could set it higher, but there’s little incentive; at 500 miles, you get a swimsuit, and there are no prizes for more.

If I estimate 250 swimming days a year (five days a week for fifty weeks), I need to swim 3520 yards each day. We’ll round up to 3600.

And my pool is open today.

Happy New Year!


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Done!

Swimming, Lake Minnetonka, 8 miles in. July 26, 2014

Swimming, Lake Minnetonka, 8 miles in. July 26, 2014

Yesterday I swam the 10 mile swim: the 2014 10-Mile USMS Open Water National Championship in Lake Minnetonka, MN. It was a great swim on a beautiful morning. There were ugly moments, and there were transcendently beautiful moments. It was the swim I had trained for; I was ready for it and it did not surprise me.

I will write a proper blog post about it with more photos when I get home, but that will be a few days from now, so I thought I would post to say that I am alive and happy and that I did it with a lot of help from my friends.

My official time: 5:03.46.